Sunday, August 10, 2008

Gah!

Don't want to talk about the exact incident.

When I supervise residents or CRNAs I am responsible for their actions...

...regardless of whether or not I am aware of them.

The case was managed correctly.

I didn't know about significant blood loss until I was informed by another anesthesia provider.

Wouldn't have done anything different, would have liked to know about it.

3 comments:

jessica said...

Interesting post. I'm thinking about becoming an Anesthesiology Assistant, and am also in the Midwest. I'm new to your blog so haven't read much yet, but would like to hear more of your thoughts on working with CRNAs and AAs...

DJB said...

Don't expect what you don't inspect. As a current anesthesia resident and having 13 year history as an NCO in the army I have to say, supervision is the responsibility of the supervisor not the supervised. I am not saying that you are guilty of this, but far to often do I have staff show up for induction and then disappear back to there office for the remainder of the case. I don't like staff hovering but they should periodically check in if for no other reason bathroom breaks, or teaching, or, you know, supervision.

pgn said...

I would have thought that the responsibility lies with the supervisor and the supervised to let the supervisor know. Don't you have operating department technicians / a 'runner' in the theatre who would alert you if things are beginning to go wrong / if the supervised is getting too deep in trouble for everyone's comfort? But again I am not familiar / have not worked with a particular person I tend to stay during the case and always left instructions that I be called sooner than later and info as to where I am gonna be - which is usually next door.